Athletic Shoe Guidelines

What is a Podiatrist?

When to Call A Doctor


Foot Problems
General Statistics


Achilles Problems
Achilles Tendonitis | Peroneal Tendon DislocationXanthomas of the Achilles Tendon


Ankle Problems
Ankle Sprain | Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain | Osteochondritis


Arch and Ball Problems
Flat Feet | Metatarsalgia | Plantar Fibromas | Sesamoiditis


Common Foot Injuries
Ankle Sprain Injuries | Broken Ankle | Fractures | Osteochondritis | Osteochondromas | Shin Splints | Sports Injuries


Deformities
Amniotic Band Syndrome | Bunions | Claw Toe | Clubfoot Dysplasia |  Flat Feet | Gordon Syndrome | Haglunds Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidus | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Jackson Weiss Syndrome | Mallet Toes | Metatarsalgia | Osteomyelitis | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation | Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction | Sesamoiditis | Spurs | Tarsal Coalition

Diabetes and Your Feet

Diseases of the Foot
Arthritis | Cancer | Charcot Foot | Freiberg's Disease | Gout | Kaposi's Sarcoma | Kohler's Disease | Maffucci's Syndrome | Ollier's Disease | Raynaud's Disease | Severs Disease


Fungus Problems
Common Fungal Problems | Athletes Foot | Fungal Nails | Other Tips | Prevention


Heel Problems
Haglunds Deformity | Heel Callus | Heel Fissures | Plantar Fasciitis


Nail Problems
Black Toenails | Ingrown Toenails | Nail Fungus


Skin Problems
Allergies | Athletes Foot | Blisters | Burning Feet | Calluses | Corns | Cysts | Frostbite | Fungus | Gangrene | Lesions | Psoriasis | Smelly Feet and Foot Odor | Swelling | Ulcers | Warts


Toe Problems
Bunions | Claw Toe | Digital Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidis | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Intoeing | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Subungal Exotosis | Turf Toe


Vascular/Nerve Problems
Acrocyanosis | Alcoholic Neuropathy | Chilblains (Cold Feet) | Erythromelalgia | Ischemic Foot | Neuroma | Spasms | Venous Stasis


Overview of Feet and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

 

Medical Care
Diagnostic Procedures

Computed Tomography | MRI | Ultrasound | X-Rays


Orthotics


Pain Management
General Information and Tips | Pain Management for Specific Conditions


Surgical Procedures
General Information | Achilles Surgery | Ankle Surgery | Arthritis Surgery | Arthroscopy | Bunion Surgery | Cyst Removal | Flatfoot Correction | Heel Surgery | Metatarsal Surgery | Nerve Surgery | Toe Surgery


Therapies
Athlete's Foot Treatment | Cryotherapy | Extracorporeal Shock Wave | Fungal Nail Treatment | Physical Therapy | Iontophoresis | Neurolysis


Fitness and Your Feet
Exercise Those Toes | Aerobics | Fitness and Your Feet | Stretching | Walking and Your Feet | Jogging and Running


Sports and Your Feet
Baseball | Basketball | Cycling | Golf | Jogging and Running | Tennis


Foot Care
Basic Foot Care Guidelines | Athletic Foot Care | Blisters | Childrens Feet | Corns and Calluses | Diabetic Foot Care | Foot Care for Seniors | Foot Self Exam | Pedicures | Your Feet at Work | Bunion Prevention | Burning Feet | Ingrown Nails | Nutrition For Your Feet


Women's Feet
High Heels | Stockings? | Pregnancy | Women Over 65


Foot Odor and Smelly Feet
Prevention | Treating Foot Odor


Shoes
Facts About Shoes | Anatomy of a Shoe | Athletic Shoe Guidelines | Children's Shoes | Corrective and Prescription Shoes | What to Look For |  Men's Shoes | Women's Shoes | Your Footprint | Wear Patterns


Links
Associations/Groups | Government |  Online Resources

 

 

Athletic footwear should be fitted to hold the foot in the position that's most natural to the movement involved. Athletic shoes protect your feet from stresses encountered in a given sport and to give the player more traction. The differences in design and variations in material, weight, lacing characteristics, and other factors among athletic shoes are meant to protect the areas of the feet that encounter the most stress.

Well-fitted athletic shoes need to be comfortable, yet well-constructed and appropriate for a given activity. A good fit will mitigate blisters and other skin irritations.

Sports-specific athletic shoes are a good investment for serious athletes, though perhaps a less critical consideration for non-athletes. Don't wear any sport or other shoes beyond their useful life.

A running shoe is built to take impact, while a tennis shoe is made to give relatively more support, and permit sudden stops and turns. Cross training shoes are fine for a general athletic shoe, such as for physical education classes or health club exercising, such as on stair machines and weight-lifting because they provide more lateral support and less flexibility than running shoes. They also tend to be heavier than running shoes, but most people don't need light, flexible shoes for cross-training. If a child is involved more heavily in any single sport, he or she should wear shoes specifically designed for that sport.

Our practice recommends sturdy, properly fitted athletic shoes of proper width with leather or canvas uppers, soles that are flexible (but only at the ball of the foot), cushioning, arch supports, and room for your toes. Try a well-cushioned sock for reinforcement, preferably one with acrylic fiber content so that some perspiration moisture is "wicked" away.

Athletic shoes need to be replaced after one year, whether or not they are worn, and after a certain amount of repetitive load is placed on them and wears them down. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles of wear, and replacing aerobic, basketball, and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear. Athletic shoes should also be replaced if they show signs of unevenness when placed on a flat surface, display noticeable creasing, and/or when the heel counter breaks down.