DMFA Blog

Posts for tag: sports injuries

By Dr. Michelle Kim
March 26, 2015
Category: Uncategorized

 

March can be Madness on your feet!

Especially, if you’re a basketball player. Athletes are constantly pushing their feet and their bodies to the limit. There is extra pressure being put on their feet at every jump, hop, and sprint. The risk for torn ligaments, stretched muscles, sprains, and broken bones is very high. For this reason, proper shoe gear is a necessity to try and minimize these problems.

 

When selecting athletic footwear it is important to keep these things in mind:

                - Choose a shoe that is right for the sport you are participating in; wrong shoe type can cause                     pain and higher potential for injury.

                - A wide toe box gives room for toes to move. Lack of space can lead to blisters, corns and                   calluses.

                - Lightweight, breathable materials are recommended.

                - Dense, abrasion resistant soles that are low to the ground give better traction & support.

                - Make sure you have a well cushioned mid-sole for a shock absorbing layer.

                - The shoes should bend in the forefoot, and have less bend in the arch – you need added                    support in the arch to keep the foot stable.

                - Must have a firm heel counter that fits snugly.

Ankle sprains are particularly common in basketball but repeated shock and pressure on the foot can lead to inflammations like Achilles Tendinitis, Plantar Fasciitis and Sesamoiditis. To help avoid these problems and others associated with basketball, be sure to be proactive and choose the right shoes to support your feet and to keep you on the court!

 

Millions of Americans were glued to their TV’s Sunday night watching one of the most anticipated events of the year… The Super Bowl! Many rejoiced as the New England Patriot’s took home their fourth Super Bowl title, while others cried as they emptied their pockets to bets lost on the Seattle Seahawks. Regardless of which team you were cheering for, the Super Bowl kept fans on their feet until the very last minute of the game. It was a game full of excitement, emotions, and unforgettable moments.

Whether you are a professional athlete or play sports just for fun, the demands made on your feet and lower limbs during football can lead to a range of injuries, including blisters, sprained ankles, torn ligaments, shin splints, knee pain, lower back pain and other joint or muscle problems. Added to these are common complaints such as corns, calluses and athlete's foot.

 It doesn’t matter if it’s college football, flag football, arena football, or touch football, the foot and ankle are very susceptible to injury when playing a high contact sport like this.  Your running style, quality of footwear, and even minor limb length differences can contribute to injuries.

At DM Foot & Ankle Associates we treat many athletes that have injuries or problems that can be avoided by implementing a few easy habits into their routine. Here are some tips that could help to prevent future injury or foot problems for athletes:

-  Picking the right type of shoe for your sport is one of the most important things you can do to ensure proper balance, control, and support for the high stress and intensity that your foot will go through.

-  Using custom orthotics will further support your foot and customize the right fit.

-  Wash your feet everyday and dry them thoroughly.

-  Replace your shoes every year or if they show signs of unevenness when placed on a flat surface, display noticeable creasing, and/or when the heel counter breaks down.

- Wear only good quality, well- fitting socks that not only help to cushion your feet but also keep moisture away from the feet.

Dr. Kim and I treat all types of sports injuries and problems, from sprained ankles to broken bones to foot fungus. If you or someone you know has any of these issues, make an appointment to get your foot assessed and we can start immediate treatment to get you back out on the field. It is important to protect your feet and ankles in any sport that you participate in so that you can stay involved in the things you love to do and play like a champion!

 

 

By: Diana Emini


When the U.S. men's soccer team played Germany in the World Cup last week, thousands of fans crowded into Chicago's Grant Park to watch on giant screens.

Team USA lost the match, but World Cup fever has hit hard, and many soccer fans are following the action.

As podiatrists at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, Dr. Michelle Kim and I love to see people excited about sports, but we know soccer can lead to painful injuries. One problem the sport can create is Achilles tendonitis.

The Achilles tendon is the band of tissue that connects the calf muscles at the back of the lower leg to the heel bone. Those who suffer from it experience irritation and inflammation in the large tendon in the back of the ankle. The injury tends to be common in athletes -- especially those who play soccer -- as a result of getting stepped on or kicked, rolling the ankle the wrong way or too much force when starting or ending a sprint.

Most often, the inflammation that comes with the injury can lead to pain and swelling.

There are several factors that may increase a person's risk of Achilles tendonitis:

  • Age and sex: Achilles tendinitis is common among middle-aged men.

  • A naturally flat foot arch can put more strain on the Achilles tendon. Obesity and tight calf muscles also can increase the strain.

  • Running or exercising in old, worn-out shoes can increase the risk. Running on hilly terrain also can put someone at higher risk of Achilles injury.

  • Those with diabetes or high blood pressure may be at at higher risk

  • Certain types of antibiotics have been linked with a higher risk of Achilles tendinitis.

The good news is that Achilles tendonitis often responds well to measures such as rest and ice. When it's persistent, treatment can include:

  • Medications: These can include over-the-counter drugs for pain, or stronger medications to reduce inflammation

  • Physical therapy such as stretching and strengthening exercises

  • Shoe inserts that elevate the heel to ease strain on the tendon

  • Surgery: If conservative treatments aren't effective or if the tendon tears, this might be done to repair the Achilles tendon

If you're suffering from Achilles pain from soccer or other sports, call our office so we can evaluate you and get you on the path back to health. We hope you enjoy watching the World Cup this summer, and go Team USA!

By Diana Emini

Earlier this week, many soccer fans were glued to TVs as the U.S. men's team took on – and defeated – Ghana during America's World Cup debut.

Back here in Lemont, Dr. Diana Emini and I know that soccer is a sport that's popular among people of all ages – especially kids.

But as podiatrists at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, we know that some kids who play soccer and other sports can suffer from heel pain as a result of Sever's disease. It's a painful bone disorder that results from inflammation of the growth plate in the heel (an area at the tip of a developing bone where cartilage cells transform into bone cells.)

Sever's disease can be a big cause of heel pain in growing kids who are physically active. It usually occurs during the growth spurt that comes with adolescence – typically between the ages of 8 and 13 for girls and 10 and 15 for boys.

According to kidshealth.org, Sever's disease can result from sports that involve running and jumping on hard surfaces – think track, basketball, soccer and gymnastics. In addition, ill-fitting shoes can lead to the condition if they don't offer enough support or padding.

 

By Michelle Kim

Many sports fans have been glued to the TV this week watching the NHL hockey playoffs and cheering on the Chicago Blackhawks as they try  winning their third Stanley Cup since 2010.

As a result of living so close to a championship-winning team, many kids across Lemont and beyond may have been prompted to pick up the sport in recent years.

Hockey has exploded in popularity. According to USA Hockey – the national governing body for youth ice hockey in the U.S. -- national membership stood at 195,125 players in 1990-91. Last season, its membership jumped to 510,270.

As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I see plenty of kids with sports injuries in our Lemont office, and hockey is no exception.

According to Podiatry Today, hockey injuries fall into two categories -- high speed, low mass injuries from by a puck or stick that lead to contusions, lacerations and concussions. Then there are the low speed, high mass injuries caused by collisions with bodies or boards that usually result in sprains and fractures.

Injuries to the lower extremities account for roughly 27 percent of all hockey injuries, with 11 percent of those happening in the foot.

Meanwhile, among kids between the ages of 11 and 14, the injury rate is about one per 100 hours of playing time. Among players aged 18 to 21, the rate of injury is one per 11 hours of play. And in case you were wondering, pro players suffer injuries at a rate of one per seven hours of play – likely because of the intensity.

When it comes to hockey, sprains and strains are the most common type of injuries. In many cases, the best immediate treatment consists of R.I.C.E., which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

In addition, hockey can lead to the following:

  • Achilles tendinitis (When the tendon that connects the back of the leg to the heel becomes swollen and painful.)
  • Achilles tendon rupture (An injury to the back of the lower leg. If overstretched, the Achilles tendon can tear completely or partially. )
  • Blisters

If you or someone in your family is suffering from a sports injury, call of office get started on your way back to health. Pain is never normal, and we can get many patients into our office within a day or two.

Stay safe as you play, and go  Hawks!

By Michelle Kim