DMFA Blog

Posts for tag: heel pain

DM Foot and Ankle Associates is celebrating our 10 year anniversary this October! As part of our celebration, we’ve put together 10 questions for our doctors to answer so you can get to know the leaders of the pack a bit better. 

Dr. Emini’s 10 Questions to Celebrate 10 Years!

Q #1 - What’s your favorite way to spend a weekend?

A #1 - Relaxing in the backyard with a good book.

 

Q #2 - If you found out today was your last day on Earth, what would you do?

A #2 - Spend it with my husband and boys.

 

Q #3 - What are your hobbies and how did you get into them?

A #3 - I like to make my own soap, lotions and potions. My son has sensitive skin, so I wanted something “clean” for him to use.

 

Q #4 - What’s your favorite thing about being a podiatrist?

A #4 - Connecting with my patients and helping them to feel better.

 

Q #5 - What’s the career highlight you’re most proud of?

A #5 - Starting our practice from scratch and watching it grow!

 

Q #6 - If you could do anything besides what you’re doing now, what would you do?

A #6 - Cosmetic dermatology, jeweler or interior design

 

Q #7 - If you came back in your next life as an animal, what animal would you be?

A #7 - Panther

 

Q #8 - What type of music are you into?

A #8 - I love almost all types music. What I listen to depends on the mood I am in and the activity I am doing – working out, I like upbeat dance music. For relaxing, I like instrumental piano songs like from Max Richter.

 

Q #9 - What was the best vacation you ever took and why?

A #9 - I have been lucky enough to go on some amazing trips - ever since Dr. Kim told me I need to expand my travel horizons beyond Mexico. They have all been special and I don't know if I can pick just one, but if I had to it would be Paris - for food, history and culture.

 

Q #10 - What would be the title of your memoir?

A #10 - Where My Feet Have Led Me

 

Like getting to know our doctors better? Stay tuned for Dr. Kim’s questionnaire answers to be posted soon!

By DM Foot and Ankle Associates
December 18, 2017
Category: Uncategorized

Here at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, we are continually striving to improve patient care by investing in advanced medical equipment. After much research, we are excited to announce our newest service, the EPAT.

The EPAT stands for Extracorporeal Pulse Activation Technology. EPAT is an innovative, non-invasive way to treat pain.

How does it work?

EPAT uses pressure waves that stimulate the metabolism, enhance blood circulation, and accelerate the healing process. Damaged tissue gradually regenerates and eventually heals.

What is the EPAT used to treat?    

· Plantar fasciitis (heel pain)

· Achilles tendinitis

· Tendinitis in the foot or ankle

· Any ligament/tendon pain that is not  responding to conventional treatment methods

What to expect:

Treatment sessions will take about 5-10 minutes depending on the area being treated. Treatments are performed at our office and do not require anesthesia.

Most patients will require between 3 to 5 sessions.

Some patients report immediate pain relief after the first treatment. Maximal effects can take about 4 weeks or longer. Over 80% of patients treated report to be pain free and/or have a significant reduction in pain.

Is it safe?

EPAT is technology that has been cleared by the FDA and is currently being used around the world. Extensive clinical studies and tests have confirmed both its safety and efficacy. The EPAT treatment comes with virtually no risks or side effects.

Why consider EPAT?

EPAT success rate is equal to or greater than traditional treatment methods, including surgery. This treatment option leaves out the risks, complications, and lengthy recovery time of surgery.

 

Is this treatment something you could benefit from or do you have further questions regarding EPAT? Let’s get rid of your pain and get you back to doing the things you love, consult with your DMFA physician today! We are now proudly serving you out of two locations, Lemont and Orland Park. If you live in these towns or in nearby Lockport, Homer Glen, Burr Ridge, or Palos Heights, call (630) 863-7517 to schedule an appointment with us today!

 

 

 

Sparkly dresses, party hats, champagne, and glitter. It’s New Years Eve and it’s almost time to get all dressed up for the midnight festivities. Whether you will be attending a family party, downtown with your friends, or at Times Square waiting for the ball to drop, make sure that you are wearing the right shoes tonight!

 

We know that most women will go straight to the high heels and stilettos for special occasions like tonight, and while they may look good, those types of shoes can be very destructive for your feet.  Common problems that high heels cause are:

                   Bunions: High heels cause increased ball of foot pressure that can cause or further the

                                         development of bunions that are usually formed on the side of the big toe.

 

               Hammertoes: Narrow and pointy toe box found on high heeled shoes causes pressure    

                                         on the toes and push them into a bent position that may  become permanent

                                         and rigid over time.

 

               Corns/Calluses: Repeated friction or pressure against the skin and joints of the feet                                                             can cause corns and calluses which may become painful.

 

               Neuroma: Pointy heels can also lead to a thickening of nerve tissue between the third

                                         and fourth toes that can cause pain or numbness.

 

               The Calf: Wearing heels may cause the calf muscles to shorten and tighten, leading to  

                                         heel pain.

 

               Posture: Heels lean the body forward, pushing the hips and spine out of alignment and

                                         increased pressure across the ball of foot and lack of support across the arch.

           

Dr.Kim and I see many women that have one or more of the above problems due to years of wearing heels. Fortunately, we treat these conditions at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, but we try to educate our patients about these problems before they occur, in hopes of evading unnecessary pain, foot deformities, treatment, and surgeries. 

We advise women to avoid pulling out those six inch stilettos tonight, but we know that many are reluctant to give up the high heels and would rather live through the pain in the name of fashion. We’re women, we get it. So, instead of the super uncomfortable stiletto, we suggest going for a lower, chunkier heel or wedge tonight. This will help take some of the pressure off your feet and offer more stability while still looking stylish. Be sure to bring an extra pair of good-quality, oxford-type shoes that can be changed into later on so as to limit the amount of time wearing heels. After a night of high activity in high heels, wear more sensible shoes the following days to give your feet a break.

Be sure to start 2015 off in the right shoes! Happy New Year!


When the U.S. men's soccer team played Germany in the World Cup last week, thousands of fans crowded into Chicago's Grant Park to watch on giant screens.

Team USA lost the match, but World Cup fever has hit hard, and many soccer fans are following the action.

As podiatrists at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, Dr. Michelle Kim and I love to see people excited about sports, but we know soccer can lead to painful injuries. One problem the sport can create is Achilles tendonitis.

The Achilles tendon is the band of tissue that connects the calf muscles at the back of the lower leg to the heel bone. Those who suffer from it experience irritation and inflammation in the large tendon in the back of the ankle. The injury tends to be common in athletes -- especially those who play soccer -- as a result of getting stepped on or kicked, rolling the ankle the wrong way or too much force when starting or ending a sprint.

Most often, the inflammation that comes with the injury can lead to pain and swelling.

There are several factors that may increase a person's risk of Achilles tendonitis:

  • Age and sex: Achilles tendinitis is common among middle-aged men.

  • A naturally flat foot arch can put more strain on the Achilles tendon. Obesity and tight calf muscles also can increase the strain.

  • Running or exercising in old, worn-out shoes can increase the risk. Running on hilly terrain also can put someone at higher risk of Achilles injury.

  • Those with diabetes or high blood pressure may be at at higher risk

  • Certain types of antibiotics have been linked with a higher risk of Achilles tendinitis.

The good news is that Achilles tendonitis often responds well to measures such as rest and ice. When it's persistent, treatment can include:

  • Medications: These can include over-the-counter drugs for pain, or stronger medications to reduce inflammation

  • Physical therapy such as stretching and strengthening exercises

  • Shoe inserts that elevate the heel to ease strain on the tendon

  • Surgery: If conservative treatments aren't effective or if the tendon tears, this might be done to repair the Achilles tendon

If you're suffering from Achilles pain from soccer or other sports, call our office so we can evaluate you and get you on the path back to health. We hope you enjoy watching the World Cup this summer, and go Team USA!

By Diana Emini

Earlier this week, many soccer fans were glued to TVs as the U.S. men's team took on – and defeated – Ghana during America's World Cup debut.

Back here in Lemont, Dr. Diana Emini and I know that soccer is a sport that's popular among people of all ages – especially kids.

But as podiatrists at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, we know that some kids who play soccer and other sports can suffer from heel pain as a result of Sever's disease. It's a painful bone disorder that results from inflammation of the growth plate in the heel (an area at the tip of a developing bone where cartilage cells transform into bone cells.)

Sever's disease can be a big cause of heel pain in growing kids who are physically active. It usually occurs during the growth spurt that comes with adolescence – typically between the ages of 8 and 13 for girls and 10 and 15 for boys.

According to kidshealth.org, Sever's disease can result from sports that involve running and jumping on hard surfaces – think track, basketball, soccer and gymnastics. In addition, ill-fitting shoes can lead to the condition if they don't offer enough support or padding.

 

By Michelle Kim