DMFA Blog

Posts for tag: blisters

 

Millions of Americans were glued to their TV’s Sunday night watching one of the most anticipated events of the year… The Super Bowl! Many rejoiced as the New England Patriot’s took home their fourth Super Bowl title, while others cried as they emptied their pockets to bets lost on the Seattle Seahawks. Regardless of which team you were cheering for, the Super Bowl kept fans on their feet until the very last minute of the game. It was a game full of excitement, emotions, and unforgettable moments.

Whether you are a professional athlete or play sports just for fun, the demands made on your feet and lower limbs during football can lead to a range of injuries, including blisters, sprained ankles, torn ligaments, shin splints, knee pain, lower back pain and other joint or muscle problems. Added to these are common complaints such as corns, calluses and athlete's foot.

 It doesn’t matter if it’s college football, flag football, arena football, or touch football, the foot and ankle are very susceptible to injury when playing a high contact sport like this.  Your running style, quality of footwear, and even minor limb length differences can contribute to injuries.

At DM Foot & Ankle Associates we treat many athletes that have injuries or problems that can be avoided by implementing a few easy habits into their routine. Here are some tips that could help to prevent future injury or foot problems for athletes:

-  Picking the right type of shoe for your sport is one of the most important things you can do to ensure proper balance, control, and support for the high stress and intensity that your foot will go through.

-  Using custom orthotics will further support your foot and customize the right fit.

-  Wash your feet everyday and dry them thoroughly.

-  Replace your shoes every year or if they show signs of unevenness when placed on a flat surface, display noticeable creasing, and/or when the heel counter breaks down.

- Wear only good quality, well- fitting socks that not only help to cushion your feet but also keep moisture away from the feet.

Dr. Kim and I treat all types of sports injuries and problems, from sprained ankles to broken bones to foot fungus. If you or someone you know has any of these issues, make an appointment to get your foot assessed and we can start immediate treatment to get you back out on the field. It is important to protect your feet and ankles in any sport that you participate in so that you can stay involved in the things you love to do and play like a champion!

 

 

By: Diana Emini

By Dr. Michelle Kim
January 28, 2015
Category: socks

Most of us have drawers full of mismatched socks of all sizes, shapes, and colors. But even though we may have a lot of socks, we have very few of the “right” kind of socks.  We’ve paid very little attention to the material of the sock and have ended up with mostly cotton socks. Unfortunately, in the winter this can be quite a problem, in fact cotton socks could just be your foot’s worst enemy in the winter.

Many people aren’t aware of the importance of a quality winter sock. Socks affect your feet in many different ways; everything from infections, to fungi, to blisters, and your toenails are directly affected by the type of socks that you wear on a daily basis.

Insulation is extremely important when choosing the type of sock you are going to wear in the winter. Cotton socks fail to keep your feet insulated and no matter how thick they are, they do very little to combat the cold. Instead of keeping out moisture, cotton socks soak in and retain moisture. The socks then actually expand and become loose on your feet.

The type of socks that are guaranteed to help keep your feet warm are socks made of natural fiber blends such as wool, cashmere, or sheepskin.  Natural fibers will keep the body well-insulated, as they would for an animal. 

The socks that you wear should fit well and be thicker than the everyday sock.  Should your socks become moist, it is imperative to change out of these as soon as possible.

At DM Foot & Ankle Associates, Dr. Emini and I see many problems that can be avoided by simply wearing the right type of socks and shoe gear. So take control of your foot health today and start buying the right kind of socks and shoes for the cold winter weeks ahead!

 

 

 

BY: Michelle Kim

For many people, getting their fill of cold weather sports may not be limited to watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Plenty of locals from Lemont are sure to make ski or snowboard trips this winter to places such as Four Lakes in Lisle or Villa Olivia in Bartlett – not to mention resorts in Wisconsin or Michigan.

Skiing is great exercise, but can also damage the feet. Here are a few tips for the slopes from the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists. After all, your feet and ankles act as shock absorbers and brakes while skiing – make sure they are protected.

Blisters and bruises

It may sound minor, but a bruise or blister can keep you off the slopes! The ankle, toes, top of the foot and front of the shin can get rubbed by ski boots – even those that fit well. Plus, moisture held against the foot can cause friction and cause blisters.

Remember not to pop a blister. If it breaks naturally, apply antiseptic and cover it with a bandage. Skiers who are prone to blistering in a specific area might consider dabbing Vaseline on that spot before skiing.

 

Foot conditions

Ski boots have potential to aggrivate pre-existing issues such as bunions, while diseases such as diabetes – which can impact circulation – can get worse by the cold and footwear that doesn’t fit right. Before skiing, people with these conditions should consult a podiatrist such as Dr. Michelle Kim and myself at DM Foot and Ankle. For many conditions, keeping the feet warm and dry is the best prevention.

 

Good boots

Boots should fit snugly – if they’re too loose, the feet and ankles can slide around. Meanwhile, the pressure and motion of skiing could lead to sprains, strains and fractures.

Your boots should be rigid enough to keep your feet, ankles and heels in place, with enough room for your ankle to flex. The toe should not be too tight.  Check the fit of your boots by kicking your heel, then your toe, against the ground. If your foot slides forward and back, the boot is probably too loose.

Try on several pairs and wear them around the shop before deciding on a boot.

 

Socks

A good sock will keep your feet dry by wicking moisture from the feet while keeping them warm.  Take your socks with you when you try on boots. Both podiatrists and ski experts recommend thin socks. 

By Diana Emini

It's hard to believe, but the holidays are here. People are putting up decorations, planning Hanukkah and Christmas gatherings and making plans for New Year's Eve.

But come Jan. 1, many people across Lemont and beyond are sure to make resolutions to get into shape.

In fact, the American College of Sports Medicine recently released it's list of exercise trends expected to be big in 2014.

The list includes:

High-Intensity Interval Training: Also known as HIIT, this type of exercise took the No. 1 spot. It involves short bursts of activity followed by a short period of rest or recovery. These exercise programs usually take 30 minutes or less.

Fitness Programs for Older Adults. As baby boomers age toward retirement, many members of this generation will have more discretionary money. As a result, many fitness professionals are creating programs to keep older adults healthy and active.

Group Personal Training. Thanks to the tough economy – which left many gym-goes with less money to spend on pricey training -- many trainers began offering options where they work with two or three clients at once.

Boot Camp.  Patterned after military-style training, Boot Camp includes cardiovascular, strength, endurance and flexibility drills led by an instructor.

Yoga. It's been around forever, but today, there's practically a yoga studio on every corner. That could be because yoga comes in a variety of forms: Power Yoga, Yogalates, and Bikram Yoga (better known as “hot yoga.”)

No matter what exercise you choose – and as podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I encourage lifestyles that include fitness – it's important to have proper footwear.  

Athletic shoes must be comfortable, well-constructed and appropriate for a given activity. Shoes that fit well should help avoid blisters and skin irritations.

Also, keep in mind that different shoes serve different purposes.

Running shoes are built to take impact, but tennis shoes allow for sudden stops and turns. Meanwhile, cross training shoes are fine for PE classes or activities at the gym such as on stair-climbing machines and weight-lifting.

We recommend patients replace athletic shoes after one year – even if they aren't worn out. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles, and getting new aerobic, basketball and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear.

By following some of these guidelines, we hope you will stay on your feet and reach your fitness goals for 2014!


By Michelle Kim