DMFA Blog

Posts for tag: athletic shoes

Earlier this week, many soccer fans were glued to TVs as the U.S. men's team took on – and defeated – Ghana during America's World Cup debut.

Back here in Lemont, Dr. Diana Emini and I know that soccer is a sport that's popular among people of all ages – especially kids.

But as podiatrists at DM Foot & Ankle Associates, we know that some kids who play soccer and other sports can suffer from heel pain as a result of Sever's disease. It's a painful bone disorder that results from inflammation of the growth plate in the heel (an area at the tip of a developing bone where cartilage cells transform into bone cells.)

Sever's disease can be a big cause of heel pain in growing kids who are physically active. It usually occurs during the growth spurt that comes with adolescence – typically between the ages of 8 and 13 for girls and 10 and 15 for boys.

According to kidshealth.org, Sever's disease can result from sports that involve running and jumping on hard surfaces – think track, basketball, soccer and gymnastics. In addition, ill-fitting shoes can lead to the condition if they don't offer enough support or padding.

 

By Michelle Kim

 

As movies and musicals such as “Bring It On” have shown, cheerleading is most definitely a sport.

 

Right here in town, we have several young ladies who can back up that statement – last month, Lemont High School's cheerleading squad brought home the 2014 IHSA Medium Division Cheerleading State Championship.

 

The sport has even evolved to the point where it has its own nationally recognized week. Since 2005, the first week in March has been recognized as National Cheerleading Week to bring attention to the hard work and dedication of cheer athletes.

 

Like most sports, cheerleading is not for the weak – it's requires strength, flexibility and explosive movements. As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle, Dr. Diana Emini and I know that young men and women who cheer can be prone to injuries such as ankle sprains as a result of landing off-balance or on the edge of a mat after jumping or tumbling. Fractures are also common from the impact of repeatedly landing hard from dismounts.

 

We see many young athletes in our Lemont office, and no matter what sport they play, we advise everyone to wear proper athletic shoes.

 

In general, athletic shoes should have the following qualities:

 

  • They should be well-fitted enough to be comfortable, but well-constructed and appropriate for the sport you are playing. A good fit will prevent blisters and other skin irritations.

     

  • For serious athletes, sports-specific shoes are a good investment, but may not be as critical for non-athletes. Don't wear an athletic shoe -- or other shoes – beyond their useful life.

     

     

  • We suggest sturdy shoes of proper width with leather or canvas uppers, soles that are flexible at the ball of the foot, cushioning, arch supports and room for your toes. Pair your shoes with a well-cushioned sock, preferably one that “wicks” away moisture.

     

  • Replace athletic shoes after one year. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles of wear, and replacing aerobic, basketball, and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear.

     

Whether you're a young athlete or just planning to play outdoors once spring arrives, call our office if you need help picking a sports shoe. We have several we recommend and can help you narrow your choices.

We want to make sure all our local athletes stay safe while they play, and congrats again to Lemont's state-championship-winning cheerleaders!

 

By Michelle Kim

It's hard to believe, but the holidays are here. People are putting up decorations, planning Hanukkah and Christmas gatherings and making plans for New Year's Eve.

But come Jan. 1, many people across Lemont and beyond are sure to make resolutions to get into shape.

In fact, the American College of Sports Medicine recently released it's list of exercise trends expected to be big in 2014.

The list includes:

High-Intensity Interval Training: Also known as HIIT, this type of exercise took the No. 1 spot. It involves short bursts of activity followed by a short period of rest or recovery. These exercise programs usually take 30 minutes or less.

Fitness Programs for Older Adults. As baby boomers age toward retirement, many members of this generation will have more discretionary money. As a result, many fitness professionals are creating programs to keep older adults healthy and active.

Group Personal Training. Thanks to the tough economy – which left many gym-goes with less money to spend on pricey training -- many trainers began offering options where they work with two or three clients at once.

Boot Camp.  Patterned after military-style training, Boot Camp includes cardiovascular, strength, endurance and flexibility drills led by an instructor.

Yoga. It's been around forever, but today, there's practically a yoga studio on every corner. That could be because yoga comes in a variety of forms: Power Yoga, Yogalates, and Bikram Yoga (better known as “hot yoga.”)

No matter what exercise you choose – and as podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I encourage lifestyles that include fitness – it's important to have proper footwear.  

Athletic shoes must be comfortable, well-constructed and appropriate for a given activity. Shoes that fit well should help avoid blisters and skin irritations.

Also, keep in mind that different shoes serve different purposes.

Running shoes are built to take impact, but tennis shoes allow for sudden stops and turns. Meanwhile, cross training shoes are fine for PE classes or activities at the gym such as on stair-climbing machines and weight-lifting.

We recommend patients replace athletic shoes after one year – even if they aren't worn out. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles, and getting new aerobic, basketball and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear.

By following some of these guidelines, we hope you will stay on your feet and reach your fitness goals for 2014!


By Michelle Kim