DMFA Blog

Posts for tag: ankle sprains

From last month's Quarryman Challenge race in Lemont to the recent Bacon Chase 5K at Montrose Beach to the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in October, there are plenty of races happening in the area during the warm months to keep runners active.

At DM Foot & Ankle Ankle, my colleague, Dr. Michelle Kim, and I see lots of runners in our Lemont office. They come to us with everything from heel pain to ankle sprains. And when it comes to running shoes, it seems the trend of running in minimalist shoes – think of the FiveFingers shoes made my Vibram – are giving way to footwear that's quite the opposite.

According to a recent article in The Washington Post, some runners are giving up “barely there” shoes in favor of those offering “maximal cushioning” to help provide exercise without destroying the legs.

These types of shoes look like updated, more colorful models of orthopedic footwear – and the Post claims some have called them “clown shoes” – but nearly a half-dozen shoe makers, including Nike, Brooks and New Balance, recently started selling shoes with soles that are roughly 30 percent thicker than typical running shoes.

The Post reports the first company to offer the super-cushioned shoes was Hoka One One. The company’s president even touts the design, according to the Post, as “the most dramatic advance in running footwear in 30 years” because the shoes' soft ride may help runners whose legs have taken a beating over the years.

But this is not the first time a shoe company has made such claims. Makers of barefoot and minimalist shoes also said their footwear could prevent injury. Those at shoe company Vibram, makers of the FiveFingers shoe, agreed to refund $3.75 million to customer last month after a lawsuit accused the company of making claims that it couldn’t support – mainly that its shoes reduce injuries and strengthen foot muscles.

At DM Foot & Ankle, we know there are lots of choices when it comes to running shoes, and we are happy to offer advice based on your foot and ankle needs. Call our office if you need help picking out the right running footwear – we also offer pre-made and custom inserts that many runners find helpful.

Good luck as you put miles on your shoes this summer!

By Diana Emini

Many sports fans have been glued to the TV this week watching the NHL hockey playoffs and cheering on the Chicago Blackhawks as they try  winning their third Stanley Cup since 2010.

As a result of living so close to a championship-winning team, many kids across Lemont and beyond may have been prompted to pick up the sport in recent years.

Hockey has exploded in popularity. According to USA Hockey – the national governing body for youth ice hockey in the U.S. -- national membership stood at 195,125 players in 1990-91. Last season, its membership jumped to 510,270.

As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I see plenty of kids with sports injuries in our Lemont office, and hockey is no exception.

According to Podiatry Today, hockey injuries fall into two categories -- high speed, low mass injuries from by a puck or stick that lead to contusions, lacerations and concussions. Then there are the low speed, high mass injuries caused by collisions with bodies or boards that usually result in sprains and fractures.

Injuries to the lower extremities account for roughly 27 percent of all hockey injuries, with 11 percent of those happening in the foot.

Meanwhile, among kids between the ages of 11 and 14, the injury rate is about one per 100 hours of playing time. Among players aged 18 to 21, the rate of injury is one per 11 hours of play. And in case you were wondering, pro players suffer injuries at a rate of one per seven hours of play – likely because of the intensity.

When it comes to hockey, sprains and strains are the most common type of injuries. In many cases, the best immediate treatment consists of R.I.C.E., which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

In addition, hockey can lead to the following:

  • Achilles tendinitis (When the tendon that connects the back of the leg to the heel becomes swollen and painful.)
  • Achilles tendon rupture (An injury to the back of the lower leg. If overstretched, the Achilles tendon can tear completely or partially. )
  • Blisters

If you or someone in your family is suffering from a sports injury, call of office get started on your way back to health. Pain is never normal, and we can get many patients into our office within a day or two.

Stay safe as you play, and go  Hawks!

By Michelle Kim

Warmer weather has finally arrived, and we here at DM Foot and Ankle couldn’t be happier! After a long winter, we know lots of people in and around Lemont are looking forward to getting outdoors and being active on their feet.

With the Boston Marathon taking place Monday, April 21, we wanted to share information about a few races that are closer to home this spring and summer. As podiatrists, Dr. Michelle Kim and I treat lots of runners for heel pain, foot fractures or ankle sprains. We love seeing our patients stay active, but don’t forget to take care of your feet by wearing proper running shoes (we have a list of brands we recommend – just call or visit our Lemont office!) Also, don’t hesitate to call us if you are suffering from pain or an injury – we can even get patients in same-day!

Here’s a look at just a few races the area has to offer:

The Glo Run – May 3, Chicago –Those who register for this after-dark run (start time is 8:15 p.m. at 1100 S. Columbus Drive,) jog a three-mile course that includes flashing lights and running under inflatable lit arches and tunnels while wearing “glo gear” such as light-up-the-night necklaces and body paint.

First Midwest Half Marathon and 10K-- May 4, Palos Park: The half offers a fast, flat course, $5,000 in cash prizes and medals for all finishers. Since 2008, the race has raised more than $150,000 for the American Cancer Society for Prostate Cancer and Research, the South West Special Recreation Association and Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America

Quarryman Challenge -- May 10, Lemont --The 10 mile and 5K races start and finish in downtown Lemont and takes runners through the town’s scenic, hilly, historic neighborhoods. Hand-crafted “piece of the rock” awards made from local quarry stone are handed to the top three men’s and women’s finishers and winners in each age group.

Fleet Feet Sports Solider Field 10-Mile – May 24, Chicago – The 11th running of this 10-mile race takes place Memorial Day weekend. Finishers start outside Solider Field, run along Lake Michigan and finish by sprinting across the football stadium’s 50-yard line.

Bacon Chase 5K and 0.05K – June 6, Chicago:This new 5K race at Montrose Beach benefits St. Jude's Children's Hospital. Runners can choose the standard 3.1-mile course,  dubbed the "Piggy Pilgrimage," or there’s a much shorter option -- a .05K course measuring 164 feet called the "Blitz to Bacon."  Registration includes all-you-can-eat bacon at the finish line and bacon bits along the course. There’s a free bloody Mary and a bacon-scented race bib.

By Diana Emini

 

As movies and musicals such as “Bring It On” have shown, cheerleading is most definitely a sport.

 

Right here in town, we have several young ladies who can back up that statement – last month, Lemont High School's cheerleading squad brought home the 2014 IHSA Medium Division Cheerleading State Championship.

 

The sport has even evolved to the point where it has its own nationally recognized week. Since 2005, the first week in March has been recognized as National Cheerleading Week to bring attention to the hard work and dedication of cheer athletes.

 

Like most sports, cheerleading is not for the weak – it's requires strength, flexibility and explosive movements. As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle, Dr. Diana Emini and I know that young men and women who cheer can be prone to injuries such as ankle sprains as a result of landing off-balance or on the edge of a mat after jumping or tumbling. Fractures are also common from the impact of repeatedly landing hard from dismounts.

 

We see many young athletes in our Lemont office, and no matter what sport they play, we advise everyone to wear proper athletic shoes.

 

In general, athletic shoes should have the following qualities:

 

  • They should be well-fitted enough to be comfortable, but well-constructed and appropriate for the sport you are playing. A good fit will prevent blisters and other skin irritations.

     

  • For serious athletes, sports-specific shoes are a good investment, but may not be as critical for non-athletes. Don't wear an athletic shoe -- or other shoes – beyond their useful life.

     

     

  • We suggest sturdy shoes of proper width with leather or canvas uppers, soles that are flexible at the ball of the foot, cushioning, arch supports and room for your toes. Pair your shoes with a well-cushioned sock, preferably one that “wicks” away moisture.

     

  • Replace athletic shoes after one year. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles of wear, and replacing aerobic, basketball, and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear.

     

Whether you're a young athlete or just planning to play outdoors once spring arrives, call our office if you need help picking a sports shoe. We have several we recommend and can help you narrow your choices.

We want to make sure all our local athletes stay safe while they play, and congrats again to Lemont's state-championship-winning cheerleaders!

 

By Michelle Kim

Since Sunday's ceremony, the Oscars have been talked about everywhere from E! News to morning talk shows to Facebook and folks around the water cooler.

 

This year's ceremony lent itself to plenty of memorable moments – from the “Oscar selfie” starring Bradley Cooper, Meryl Steep, Jennifer Lawrence and other A-listers that host Ellen DeGeneres shared on Twitter to John Travolta introducing “Frozen” singer Idina Menzel as “Adela Dazeem” to traditional talk about the fashions, this year's ceremony became an instant part of pop culture.

 

As usual, many celebrities wore long gowns paired with tall high heels. While the fashions are always debated, as podiatrists, we know for sure that sporting Oscar-style shoes on a regular basis is a less-than-glamorous way to treat your feet.

 

That's because humans are naturally meant to walk heel-to-toe with legs at roughly a 90-degree angle to the foot. High heels alter the position of the foot and how it functions. In short, that means problems can happen.

 

For one, the shoes can cause corns to develop under the balls of the foot where body weight presses down – for some women, this can create the sensation of stepping on small stones as they walk.

 

Meanwhile, pointy high heels that squeeze the toes can lead to neuromas (in essence, pinched nerves;) tightening of the Achilles tendon (the band that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone;) severe heel pain and even stress fractures or cracks in the bones of the foot.

 

At DM Foot and Ankle, my colleague, Dr. Michelle Kim, and I advise women to avoid wearing tall high heels and stilettos. However, we know that some ladies have jobs that require dressy shoes or are reluctant to give up high heels. In these situations, we suggest a bigger, chunkier heel or wedge to lessen the chance of ankle sprains or injuries. We also offer supportive inserts that can fit into many heels and dress shoes.

 

If you are suffering from pain from high heels or stilettos, or are interested in getting inserts for your dress shoes, call our Lemont office. We can help with any pain or problems and help you protect your feet so you can enjoy everyday life – and maybe get out there and see a few new Oscar-winning movies!

 

By Diana Emini