DMFA Blog

Posts for tag: Diana Emini

By Dr. Michelle Kim
January 28, 2015
Category: socks

Most of us have drawers full of mismatched socks of all sizes, shapes, and colors. But even though we may have a lot of socks, we have very few of the “right” kind of socks.  We’ve paid very little attention to the material of the sock and have ended up with mostly cotton socks. Unfortunately, in the winter this can be quite a problem, in fact cotton socks could just be your foot’s worst enemy in the winter.

Many people aren’t aware of the importance of a quality winter sock. Socks affect your feet in many different ways; everything from infections, to fungi, to blisters, and your toenails are directly affected by the type of socks that you wear on a daily basis.

Insulation is extremely important when choosing the type of sock you are going to wear in the winter. Cotton socks fail to keep your feet insulated and no matter how thick they are, they do very little to combat the cold. Instead of keeping out moisture, cotton socks soak in and retain moisture. The socks then actually expand and become loose on your feet.

The type of socks that are guaranteed to help keep your feet warm are socks made of natural fiber blends such as wool, cashmere, or sheepskin.  Natural fibers will keep the body well-insulated, as they would for an animal. 

The socks that you wear should fit well and be thicker than the everyday sock.  Should your socks become moist, it is imperative to change out of these as soon as possible.

At DM Foot & Ankle Associates, Dr. Emini and I see many problems that can be avoided by simply wearing the right type of socks and shoe gear. So take control of your foot health today and start buying the right kind of socks and shoes for the cold winter weeks ahead!

 

 

 

BY: Michelle Kim

By Michelle Kim
November 12, 2014
Category: diabetes

 

 

"To The Veterans of the United States of America: Thank you, for the cost you paid for our freedom, thank you for the freedom to live in safety and pursue happiness, for freedom of speech, and for all the freedoms that we daily take for granted.”

                                                Sara Niles, Torn From the Inside Out

 

Veteran’s Day annually falls on November 11th and marks an important day of honoring our veterans for their loyalty, hard work, and willingness to serve their country. We take time to celebrate the sacrifice and achievements of millions of Americans who have served and protected our nation both in times of peace, and war.

While this day is most dear to us, November brings to light another topic that affects millions of Americans and Veterans alike, Diabetes. American Diabetes Month is a time of raising awareness of the issues surrounding diabetes, as well as highlighting the people that this disease impacts. While Veterans Day and diabetes awareness are both very different topics, during this month it is important to realize how they relate and why feet are such an important factor.

 

How do they relate?

 

According to the American Diabetes Association, right now, 5.5 Million Veterans receive VA (Veteran’s Health Administration) health care services. Out of those 5.5 million veterans, every 1 out of 4 has diabetes.

 

What does this have to do with feet?

 

There are many foot problems that can accompany diabetes, some can be quick and severe, while others can be slow and make you susceptible to things like peripheral arterial disease or amputations.

Here are some common problems associated with diabetes:

 

Neuropathy: Nerve damage resulting in loss of feeling in the legs as well as pain.

Skin Changes: Dry feet resulting from losing control of nerves that affect oil and moisture.

Foot Ulcers: Ulcers occur most often on the ball of the foot or on the bottom of the big toe. Ulcers on the sides of the foot are usually due to poorly fitting shoes.

Poor Circulation: Blood vessels of the foot and leg to narrow and harden

 

How can DMFA help?

Here at the DM Foot & Ankle, Dr. Emini and I offer comprehensive and healthy foot treatments for the different complications that may occur with diabetes. We schedule annual foot examinations, in which we observe and treat overall health of patient’s skin, circulation, nerves, and foot structure. For neuropathic feet, we cut toenails safely and take care of calluses, which can ulcerate if left untreated. In terms of foot protection, we have 3 different lines of diabetic shoes (approved by Medicare) that help protect the feet with extra thickness in the soles. We offer all of these services and many more! Make sure to call our office with any questions or to schedule a foot exam if you are having problems like the ones mentioned above.

Be sure to help raise awareness of diabetes this month, and to thank each and every one of the veterans in your life!

BY: Michelle Kim

Many sports fans have been glued to the TV this week watching the NHL hockey playoffs and cheering on the Chicago Blackhawks as they try  winning their third Stanley Cup since 2010.

As a result of living so close to a championship-winning team, many kids across Lemont and beyond may have been prompted to pick up the sport in recent years.

Hockey has exploded in popularity. According to USA Hockey – the national governing body for youth ice hockey in the U.S. -- national membership stood at 195,125 players in 1990-91. Last season, its membership jumped to 510,270.

As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I see plenty of kids with sports injuries in our Lemont office, and hockey is no exception.

According to Podiatry Today, hockey injuries fall into two categories -- high speed, low mass injuries from by a puck or stick that lead to contusions, lacerations and concussions. Then there are the low speed, high mass injuries caused by collisions with bodies or boards that usually result in sprains and fractures.

Injuries to the lower extremities account for roughly 27 percent of all hockey injuries, with 11 percent of those happening in the foot.

Meanwhile, among kids between the ages of 11 and 14, the injury rate is about one per 100 hours of playing time. Among players aged 18 to 21, the rate of injury is one per 11 hours of play. And in case you were wondering, pro players suffer injuries at a rate of one per seven hours of play – likely because of the intensity.

When it comes to hockey, sprains and strains are the most common type of injuries. In many cases, the best immediate treatment consists of R.I.C.E., which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

In addition, hockey can lead to the following:

  • Achilles tendinitis (When the tendon that connects the back of the leg to the heel becomes swollen and painful.)
  • Achilles tendon rupture (An injury to the back of the lower leg. If overstretched, the Achilles tendon can tear completely or partially. )
  • Blisters

If you or someone in your family is suffering from a sports injury, call of office get started on your way back to health. Pain is never normal, and we can get many patients into our office within a day or two.

Stay safe as you play, and go  Hawks!

By Michelle Kim