2014 Fitness Trends

It's hard to believe, but the holidays are here. People are putting up decorations, planning Hanukkah and Christmas gatherings and making plans for New Year's Eve.

But come Jan. 1, many people across Lemont and beyond are sure to make resolutions to get into shape.

In fact, the American College of Sports Medicine recently released it's list of exercise trends expected to be big in 2014.

The list includes:

High-Intensity Interval Training: Also known as HIIT, this type of exercise took the No. 1 spot. It involves short bursts of activity followed by a short period of rest or recovery. These exercise programs usually take 30 minutes or less.

Fitness Programs for Older Adults. As baby boomers age toward retirement, many members of this generation will have more discretionary money. As a result, many fitness professionals are creating programs to keep older adults healthy and active.

Group Personal Training. Thanks to the tough economy – which left many gym-goes with less money to spend on pricey training -- many trainers began offering options where they work with two or three clients at once.

Boot Camp.  Patterned after military-style training, Boot Camp includes cardiovascular, strength, endurance and flexibility drills led by an instructor.

Yoga. It's been around forever, but today, there's practically a yoga studio on every corner. That could be because yoga comes in a variety of forms: Power Yoga, Yogalates, and Bikram Yoga (better known as “hot yoga.”)

No matter what exercise you choose – and as podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I encourage lifestyles that include fitness – it's important to have proper footwear.  

Athletic shoes must be comfortable, well-constructed and appropriate for a given activity. Shoes that fit well should help avoid blisters and skin irritations.

Also, keep in mind that different shoes serve different purposes.

Running shoes are built to take impact, but tennis shoes allow for sudden stops and turns. Meanwhile, cross training shoes are fine for PE classes or activities at the gym such as on stair-climbing machines and weight-lifting.

We recommend patients replace athletic shoes after one year – even if they aren't worn out. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles, and getting new aerobic, basketball and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear.

By following some of these guidelines, we hope you will stay on your feet and reach your fitness goals for 2014!


By Michelle Kim

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