DMFA Blog

Posts for: March, 2014

If you have kids – or even if you don't – you've probably been watching the animated movie “Frozen,” on DVD. The movie sold over 3 million DVD copies the first day it was released last week, and has become the 12th-highest grossing film of all time – outselling blockbusters such as “The Dark Knight,” and “Star Wars Episode I – The Phantom Menace.”

 

If you've been watching the tale about a kingdom of eternal winter, it may be easy to forget that it's finally spring. In fact, we've been waiting for April to arrive at DM Foot and Ankle to recognize National Foot Health Awareness month.

 

Whether you're watching movies indoors or being active outside, it's a good time to remember our feet are indicators of our health. After all, symptoms of arthritis, diabetes, nerve and circulatory disorders can be found from the ankle down, so it's important for feet to get the care they need.

 

Feet are complex – they stabilize the body, absorb shock and propel the body forward. At some point, 75 percent of Americans will experience problems with foot health.

 

This month, we hope you remember that podiatrists such as Dr. Diana Emini and myself can be an important part of your health care. We're trained to treat most issues effecting the foot, ankle and related areas of the legs. We can care for tiny toddlers who need corrective inserts to athletes with sports injuries to adults suffering from diabetic wounds – and much more!

 

Come visit us if you have any of the following:

  • Any sort of foot pain

  • Diabetes

  • Irregularities of the foot and lower-leg (flat feet, bow legs, etc.)

  • Fresh or recurring injuries to the foot, ankle, or lower-leg

  • Infections or open sores

  • Issues with circulation

Meanwhile, in honor of Foot Health Awareness Month, we wanted to share a few facts from the Illinois Podiatric Medical Association:

 

  • Your feet contain one-quarter of all the bones in your body.
  • There are times when you walk where the pressure on your feet is more than your body weight. When running, it can be three or four times your weight.
  • Women have roughly four times as many foot problems as men, likely due to life-long patterns of wearing high heels
  • Just a small percentage of people are born with foot problems. Most often, it's lack of awareness of proper care -- including ill-fitting shoes -- that bring about problems.

We want to make sure patients are caring for their feet all year long – not just in April. Don't hesitate to call our Lemont office if you need help with any foot or ankle issue!

 

By Michelle Kim


 

Sex and the City” actress Sarah Jessica Parker recently appeared at downtown Chicago's Nordstrom store to promote her shoe and handbag line, SJP Collection.

 

One of the shoes is even named “Carrie,” the character she played on the HBO series about single, shoe-loving women in New York.

 

In addition to her shoe line, Parker and “Sex and the City” cast-mate Kristin Davis, have made news recently about the show's high-heeled footwear that was practically a character all its own.

 

As a result of daily filming in footwear from Manolo Blahnik, Jimmy Choo and Christian Louboutin, Parker recently admitted that she caused permanent damage to her feet.

 

I literally ran in heels. I worked 18-hour days and never took them off. I wore beautiful shoes, some made better than others, and never complained,” she said, according to the U.K.'s Telegraph newspaper.

 

In addition, after twisting her ankle on the set of a film, her podiatrist gave her some harsh news.

 

I went to a foot doctor and he said, ‘Your foot does things it shouldn’t be able to do. That bone there – you’ve created that bone. It doesn’t belong there,'” she said, according to the newspaper.

 

Meanwhile, fellow actress Davis Kristin Davis, who played Charlotte in the series, apologized to the Telegraph this month, saying she regrets that the show encouraged women to squeeze into too-tall stilettos on a daily basis.

 

I do feel guilt about the heels,” she told the paper. "It did seem we were trying to say to women, ‘You should be wearing heels like these’... "But we definitely weren’t...”

 

In fact, the actress admitted she now wears flats as often as possible, and when she does put on heels, it hurts.

 

As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle, Dr. Michelle Kim and I don't recommend that women wear high heels on a daily basis – instead we suggest the shoes be saved for special occasions. As the ladies of “Sex and the City” have learned, they can cause corns, severe heel pain and even cracks in the bones of the foot.

 

Call our Lemont office if you're having pain from high heels. We can also offer supportive inserts that can fit into your dress shoes.

 

Meanwhile, if you're thinking about buying a pair of shoes from Parker's new line, just remember that while the collection includes stilettos, it also offers flats.

 

 

By Diana Emini


 

As movies and musicals such as “Bring It On” have shown, cheerleading is most definitely a sport.

 

Right here in town, we have several young ladies who can back up that statement – last month, Lemont High School's cheerleading squad brought home the 2014 IHSA Medium Division Cheerleading State Championship.

 

The sport has even evolved to the point where it has its own nationally recognized week. Since 2005, the first week in March has been recognized as National Cheerleading Week to bring attention to the hard work and dedication of cheer athletes.

 

Like most sports, cheerleading is not for the weak – it's requires strength, flexibility and explosive movements. As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle, Dr. Diana Emini and I know that young men and women who cheer can be prone to injuries such as ankle sprains as a result of landing off-balance or on the edge of a mat after jumping or tumbling. Fractures are also common from the impact of repeatedly landing hard from dismounts.

 

We see many young athletes in our Lemont office, and no matter what sport they play, we advise everyone to wear proper athletic shoes.

 

In general, athletic shoes should have the following qualities:

 

  • They should be well-fitted enough to be comfortable, but well-constructed and appropriate for the sport you are playing. A good fit will prevent blisters and other skin irritations.

     

  • For serious athletes, sports-specific shoes are a good investment, but may not be as critical for non-athletes. Don't wear an athletic shoe -- or other shoes – beyond their useful life.

     

     

  • We suggest sturdy shoes of proper width with leather or canvas uppers, soles that are flexible at the ball of the foot, cushioning, arch supports and room for your toes. Pair your shoes with a well-cushioned sock, preferably one that “wicks” away moisture.

     

  • Replace athletic shoes after one year. The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine advises replacing running or walking shoes after 300 to 500 miles of wear, and replacing aerobic, basketball, and tennis shoes after 45 to 60 hours of wear.

     

Whether you're a young athlete or just planning to play outdoors once spring arrives, call our office if you need help picking a sports shoe. We have several we recommend and can help you narrow your choices.

We want to make sure all our local athletes stay safe while they play, and congrats again to Lemont's state-championship-winning cheerleaders!

 

By Michelle Kim


Since Sunday's ceremony, the Oscars have been talked about everywhere from E! News to morning talk shows to Facebook and folks around the water cooler.

 

This year's ceremony lent itself to plenty of memorable moments – from the “Oscar selfie” starring Bradley Cooper, Meryl Steep, Jennifer Lawrence and other A-listers that host Ellen DeGeneres shared on Twitter to John Travolta introducing “Frozen” singer Idina Menzel as “Adela Dazeem” to traditional talk about the fashions, this year's ceremony became an instant part of pop culture.

 

As usual, many celebrities wore long gowns paired with tall high heels. While the fashions are always debated, as podiatrists, we know for sure that sporting Oscar-style shoes on a regular basis is a less-than-glamorous way to treat your feet.

 

That's because humans are naturally meant to walk heel-to-toe with legs at roughly a 90-degree angle to the foot. High heels alter the position of the foot and how it functions. In short, that means problems can happen.

 

For one, the shoes can cause corns to develop under the balls of the foot where body weight presses down – for some women, this can create the sensation of stepping on small stones as they walk.

 

Meanwhile, pointy high heels that squeeze the toes can lead to neuromas (in essence, pinched nerves;) tightening of the Achilles tendon (the band that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone;) severe heel pain and even stress fractures or cracks in the bones of the foot.

 

At DM Foot and Ankle, my colleague, Dr. Michelle Kim, and I advise women to avoid wearing tall high heels and stilettos. However, we know that some ladies have jobs that require dressy shoes or are reluctant to give up high heels. In these situations, we suggest a bigger, chunkier heel or wedge to lessen the chance of ankle sprains or injuries. We also offer supportive inserts that can fit into many heels and dress shoes.

 

If you are suffering from pain from high heels or stilettos, or are interested in getting inserts for your dress shoes, call our Lemont office. We can help with any pain or problems and help you protect your feet so you can enjoy everyday life – and maybe get out there and see a few new Oscar-winning movies!

 

By Diana Emini