DMFA Blog

Posts for category: sports injuries

 

Millions of Americans were glued to their TV’s Sunday night watching one of the most anticipated events of the year… The Super Bowl! Many rejoiced as the New England Patriot’s took home their fourth Super Bowl title, while others cried as they emptied their pockets to bets lost on the Seattle Seahawks. Regardless of which team you were cheering for, the Super Bowl kept fans on their feet until the very last minute of the game. It was a game full of excitement, emotions, and unforgettable moments.

Whether you are a professional athlete or play sports just for fun, the demands made on your feet and lower limbs during football can lead to a range of injuries, including blisters, sprained ankles, torn ligaments, shin splints, knee pain, lower back pain and other joint or muscle problems. Added to these are common complaints such as corns, calluses and athlete's foot.

 It doesn’t matter if it’s college football, flag football, arena football, or touch football, the foot and ankle are very susceptible to injury when playing a high contact sport like this.  Your running style, quality of footwear, and even minor limb length differences can contribute to injuries.

At DM Foot & Ankle Associates we treat many athletes that have injuries or problems that can be avoided by implementing a few easy habits into their routine. Here are some tips that could help to prevent future injury or foot problems for athletes:

-  Picking the right type of shoe for your sport is one of the most important things you can do to ensure proper balance, control, and support for the high stress and intensity that your foot will go through.

-  Using custom orthotics will further support your foot and customize the right fit.

-  Wash your feet everyday and dry them thoroughly.

-  Replace your shoes every year or if they show signs of unevenness when placed on a flat surface, display noticeable creasing, and/or when the heel counter breaks down.

- Wear only good quality, well- fitting socks that not only help to cushion your feet but also keep moisture away from the feet.

Dr. Kim and I treat all types of sports injuries and problems, from sprained ankles to broken bones to foot fungus. If you or someone you know has any of these issues, make an appointment to get your foot assessed and we can start immediate treatment to get you back out on the field. It is important to protect your feet and ankles in any sport that you participate in so that you can stay involved in the things you love to do and play like a champion!

 

 

By: Diana Emini

Many sports fans have been glued to the TV this week watching the NHL hockey playoffs and cheering on the Chicago Blackhawks as they try  winning their third Stanley Cup since 2010.

As a result of living so close to a championship-winning team, many kids across Lemont and beyond may have been prompted to pick up the sport in recent years.

Hockey has exploded in popularity. According to USA Hockey – the national governing body for youth ice hockey in the U.S. -- national membership stood at 195,125 players in 1990-91. Last season, its membership jumped to 510,270.

As podiatrists at DM Foot and Ankle Associates, Dr. Diana Emini and I see plenty of kids with sports injuries in our Lemont office, and hockey is no exception.

According to Podiatry Today, hockey injuries fall into two categories -- high speed, low mass injuries from by a puck or stick that lead to contusions, lacerations and concussions. Then there are the low speed, high mass injuries caused by collisions with bodies or boards that usually result in sprains and fractures.

Injuries to the lower extremities account for roughly 27 percent of all hockey injuries, with 11 percent of those happening in the foot.

Meanwhile, among kids between the ages of 11 and 14, the injury rate is about one per 100 hours of playing time. Among players aged 18 to 21, the rate of injury is one per 11 hours of play. And in case you were wondering, pro players suffer injuries at a rate of one per seven hours of play – likely because of the intensity.

When it comes to hockey, sprains and strains are the most common type of injuries. In many cases, the best immediate treatment consists of R.I.C.E., which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

In addition, hockey can lead to the following:

  • Achilles tendinitis (When the tendon that connects the back of the leg to the heel becomes swollen and painful.)
  • Achilles tendon rupture (An injury to the back of the lower leg. If overstretched, the Achilles tendon can tear completely or partially. )
  • Blisters

If you or someone in your family is suffering from a sports injury, call of office get started on your way back to health. Pain is never normal, and we can get many patients into our office within a day or two.

Stay safe as you play, and go  Hawks!

By Michelle Kim

By Diana Emini
February 10, 2014
Category: sports injuries

Sports fans around the world have likely been watching the Winter Olympics unfold in Sochi, Russia. And as the games progress, there's sure to be plenty of action – from skiing to bobsledding to hockey.

But perhaps one of the most popular events is figure skating. Although many fans were looking forward to seeing reigning men's gold medalist (and Naperville native) Evan Lysacek compete again, he announced in December that he isn't taking part in the games because of a hip injury.

Although it's full of grace and beauty, Lysacek's situation shows skating can be hard on the body, including the feet and ankles. Whether you're gliding across the ice for fun at a local rink or are serious about the sport, here are just a few ways it can harm the feet:

  • Bunions. This is an abnormal, bony bump that forms on the joint at the base of the big toe. Basically, the bones change position and cause the big toe joint to dislocate. Over time, the bony bump can get bigger and crowd the smaller toes. According to usfigureskating.org, bunions are noted in up to 57 percent of skaters.

  • Hammertoes: This is a buckling of the toe joints. This can give a toe a curled or claw-like appearance and also come with pain or swelling. U.S. Figure Skating's website says this is found in 18 percent of skaters – the toes curl to try holding the shoe or skate on the foot.

  • Plantar fasciitis: The band stretching from the heel bone to the toes, the plantar fascia, supports the arch and absorbs shock. When it get irritated, it can create stabbing or burning pain under the heel.

    Whether you skate competitively or just for fun. Here are a few tips to avoid injury:

  • Always warm up to stretch so your muscles aren't stiff on the ice

  • Make sure to have proper instruction and training before you try anything on skates

  • Wear proper clothing and don't forget to tie back long hair. Avoid jewelry and baggy clothes.

  • Don't skate if you're already suffering from an injury.

  • Seek medical care if you suffer from pain or an injury.

We hope you stay safe on the ice this winter, but if you suffer from an injury, call us at DM Foot and Ankle. Dr. Michelle Kim and I can see urgent cases same-day in our Lemont office. Stay safe and enjoy cheering for Team USA during the Olympics!

By Diana Emini

For many people, getting their fill of cold weather sports may not be limited to watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Plenty of locals from Lemont are sure to make ski or snowboard trips this winter to places such as Four Lakes in Lisle or Villa Olivia in Bartlett – not to mention resorts in Wisconsin or Michigan.

Skiing is great exercise, but can also damage the feet. Here are a few tips for the slopes from the Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists. After all, your feet and ankles act as shock absorbers and brakes while skiing – make sure they are protected.

Blisters and bruises

It may sound minor, but a bruise or blister can keep you off the slopes! The ankle, toes, top of the foot and front of the shin can get rubbed by ski boots – even those that fit well. Plus, moisture held against the foot can cause friction and cause blisters.

Remember not to pop a blister. If it breaks naturally, apply antiseptic and cover it with a bandage. Skiers who are prone to blistering in a specific area might consider dabbing Vaseline on that spot before skiing.

 

Foot conditions

Ski boots have potential to aggrivate pre-existing issues such as bunions, while diseases such as diabetes – which can impact circulation – can get worse by the cold and footwear that doesn’t fit right. Before skiing, people with these conditions should consult a podiatrist such as Dr. Michelle Kim and myself at DM Foot and Ankle. For many conditions, keeping the feet warm and dry is the best prevention.

 

Good boots

Boots should fit snugly – if they’re too loose, the feet and ankles can slide around. Meanwhile, the pressure and motion of skiing could lead to sprains, strains and fractures.

Your boots should be rigid enough to keep your feet, ankles and heels in place, with enough room for your ankle to flex. The toe should not be too tight.  Check the fit of your boots by kicking your heel, then your toe, against the ground. If your foot slides forward and back, the boot is probably too loose.

Try on several pairs and wear them around the shop before deciding on a boot.

 

Socks

A good sock will keep your feet dry by wicking moisture from the feet while keeping them warm.  Take your socks with you when you try on boots. Both podiatrists and ski experts recommend thin socks. 

By Diana Emini